Subject Info

Intent

As a department we must encourage young people to be inquisitive, imaginative and determined; wherever children start in life. Alongside literacy and numeracy, another skill needed in our workforce today is creativity. Cultural education subjects help young people to unlock their innate creativity, enabling them to become more rounded and confident human beings.

All students within our department will have the opportunity to use a range of materials, techniques and processes including drawing, printmaking, mixed media experimentation and painting. The majority of Art lesson focus on practical tasks that allow students to gain knowledge and skills from these new experiences.

We recognise all students are on a journey with their learning, and aim for all students to have the confidence to evaluate their learning and set targets for future development and new projects.

To be successful in Art students must master skills in FOUR key areas:

  • Creative Making - developing knowledge and understanding of a range of techniques, materials and processes.
  • Reflective Recording of Ideas - becoming active participants in their own learning. Exploring personal ideas and concepts.
  • Contextual Understanding and Knowledge- researching artists and designers helps the students to put their own practice in to context.
  • Personal Presentation and Evaluation - concluding learning through evaluation and with outcomes. Personal links throughout the broad theme. 

The department ensure that students have the opportunity to access parts of the world which they have not seen before. We place emphasise on local, national and international artists, artwork, events and movements whilst creating artwork for real-life briefs and purposes – connecting students to these different areas of life. Students from all year groups are encouraged to think like real artists and experience art for themselves, through the multiple opportunities inside and outside of the classroom. The curriculum that we teach is fluid so that teachers can mould each lesson to immerse students in topics that they need to make them well-rounded, enriched and with a thirst for new knowledge.

We aspire to unlock the following in our students:

Health, well-being and growth

Connections of the past, present and future

Confidence and curiosity in our own knowledge and skills

Shared moments of history, memories, people, places and things that matter to us

A drive to innovate

Enrichment of today and an inspired tomorrow

Key Stage 3

We select themes/topics each year taking into account our experience, the students we teach and the world they are living in.

We aim to provide an art and design education that engages inspires and challenges students, equipping them with the knowledge and skills to experiment invent and create their own works of art, craft and design. As students’ progress, they should be able to think critically and develop a more rigorous understanding of art and design. They should also know how art and design both reflect and shape our history, and contribute to the culture, creativity and wealth of our nation.

  • Produce creative work, exploring their ideas and recording their experiences
  • Become proficient in drawing, painting, sculpture and other art, craft and design techniques
  • Evaluate and analyse creative works using the language of art, craft and design
  • Know about great artists, craft makers and designers, and understand the historical and cultural development of their art forms. 

Subject Content: Students are taught to develop their creativity and ideas, and increase proficiency in their execution. They should develop a critical understanding of artists, architects and designers, expressing reasoned judgements that can inform their own work.

Students are taught:

  • To use a range of techniques to record their observations in sketchbooks, journals and other media as a basis for exploring their ideas
  • To use a range of techniques and media, including painting
  • To increase their proficiency in the handling of different materials
  • To analyse and evaluate their own work, and that of others, in order to strengthen the visual impact or applications of their work
  • About the history of art, craft, design and architecture, including periods, styles and major movements from ancient times up to the present day.

Year 7 Information

Autumn 1 Diagnostic: introduction and key Art skills, Overlapping letters looking at Jasper Johns. Texture, mark making with Van Gogh colour theory.

Autumn 2:  Reading images: Picasso’s Guernica & Weeping woman. How to do an artist study using the grid method. The story behind Guernica, research, discuss and study images and symbolism within painting. Make studies of sections, using graphite pencil skills.

Spring 1:  Diwali or Tapa Art: Multicultural Art, Repeating patterns, borders, preparing backgrounds, poster layout and text in art. Spring 2Final poster linked story telling within Diwali or Tapa. Summer 2: Final mixed media piece, food image layered on repeat pattern print linked to Pop art.

Year 8 Information

Autumn 1:   Lettering Project: Exploring the word ART or students own first name in different fonts, introducing experiments with mixed media and layering. This leads on from oil pastel and watercolour experiments at the end of year 7.

Autumn 2:   Still life,: Basic shapes, observational drawing, reflections, themed still life, perspective, key vocabulary and meaning, drawing from observation, own photography and Artist studies. Create a still life composition with objects in room, choose viewpoint, then use symmetry and basic shapes to make observational study.

Spring 1:   Masks: Exploring the meanings behind masks, their cultural relevance, impact on artists. Symbolism, designing own mask on theme. Construction techniques and use of 3D materials. Notan shapes, exploring positive and negative designs. Zentangle patterns in black and white.

Spring 2: 2D and /or 3D African masks

Summer 1:  Day of the Dead Mexican Art: Extension project from Masks: Skull designs, facts on cultural celebration and links to artists. 

Year 9 Information

 Autumn 1:   Portrait project: Introduce Cubism, Pop Art and 21st Century portraits that explore collage and fragments. Own photography, working from own photos, how to draw the basic face. Using the grid method. Collage and montage, creating a face using magazine collage and creating images linked to Portraits using images from magazines. Weaving images to explore distortion. Monoprinting using line and printed portraits.

Autumn 2:  Fragmented Portrait in the style of chosen artist. Art History, what is Portraiture? Analysis of meaning and storytelling in Portraits. Explore NPG website.

Shoe Project/Surrealism

Spring 1: T-Shirt Project: T-Shirt design based on chosen band and art movement, Either Cubism, Pop art or Surrealism (all previously explored in other projects, so applying learning)

Spring 2: Final T-shirt: On paper or painted onto fabric shirt.

Summer 1: Metamorphosis shoe Surrealist shoes, What is Surrealism? Design skills, V&A research

Summer 2: Use research, development and refine skills to create outcome. A metamorphosed shoe.

Key Stage 4

It is important that students have a passion for the subject and a desire to know more about historical and contemporary art, how to use art materials and processes to develop and express their own ideas. This course will give students the skills to enjoy, engage with and produce visual arts throughout their life.

What does the course involve? Students will develop your visual skills and build a portfolio of work by completing a wide range of activities and in-depth assignments. 

Throughout the course, students will:                    

develop and explore ideas

select and experiment with appropriate media, materials, techniques and processes                

record your ideas, observations and insights

present personal and meaningful responses.

Through this course students develop transferable skills, such as problem solving, communication and critical thinking skills, which will prepare them for further study or the world of work, regardless of the subjects or career they wish to pursue.

Year 10 Information

Autumn 1:   Still life on an Individual Theme: Build up observational skills in a range of media, learn how to experiment, work in the style of an artist. Own photography, range of viewpoints, how to make a composition. Experiment with surfaces, build confidence with new approaches and techniques.

Autumn 2: Technical skills with media, use of acrylics. Media test and composition designs, use own photograph and work from direct observation. Then start final outcome.

Spring 2:  Project using a WJEC exam paper, with a choice of 12 starter questions.: Students will learn the process of research, record refine and present, but working through a series of tasks that enable them to develop an individual outcome.

Summer : Summer exam creating a final piece for the WJEC exam question selected.

Year 11 Information

Autumn 1: Project using a WJEC exam paper, with a choice of 12 starter questions. Students will learn the process of research, record refine and present, but working through a series of tasks that enable them to develop an individual outcome.

Two day Mock exam creating a final piece for the WJEC exam question selected.

HAND OUT FINAL EXAM PAPER FIRST WEEK IN FEB

Summer 1: 10 HOUR EXAM FIRST WEEK IN MAY 2022                                                        Summer 2: SUMMER EXHIBITION IN OBSERVATORY

Assessment

Personal Portfolio (Two coursework projects)

This component is worth 60% of your GCSE. You will produce a portfolio of work based on tasks agreed with your teacher.

Component 2: Externally Set Assignment (ESA)
(One exam project)

This component is worth 40% of your GCSE. You will produce preparatory studies and personal outcome(s) based on a theme set by the examination board. 

Each project will be assessed according to the following four assessment objectives

AO1: Develop ideas through investigations, demonstrating critical understanding of sources.

AO2: Refine work by exploring ideas, selecting and experimenting with appropriate media,

Materials, techniques and processes.

AO3: Record ideas, observations and insights relevant to intentions as work progresses.

AO4: Present a personal and meaningful response that realises intentions and demonstrates understanding of visual language

 

Supporting Information

http://www.art2day.co.uk

A website giving easy access to the work of contemporary artists from around the world.

 http://www.saatchigallery.com

Saatchi Gallery is an innovative forum for contemporary art, presenting work by largely unseen young artists or international artists whose work has rarely or never been exhibited in the UK.

 http://www.guggenheim.org

Guggenheim Museum showcases a collection of early modern masterpieces.

 http://www.artweb.com

A web application allowing artists, craftspeople and designers to create an online portfolio of work.

 http://www.tate.org.uk

The Tate holds the national collection of British art from 1500 to the present day as well as international modern and contemporary art.

 http://www.vam.ac.uk

The Victoria and Albert Museum in London promotes the practice of design, and knowledge, understanding and enjoyment of the designed world.

 http://www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk

The Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge houses diverse and varied collections for the benefit of the nation.

 http://www.britishmuseum.org

The British Museum houses a vast collection of world art and artefacts.

 http://www.creativebloq.com

A website giving creative tips and inspiration across web design, graphic design, three-dimensional design and more.

http://www.npg.org.uk

National Portrait Gallery showcases the world’s most extensive collection of portraits.

http://africa.si.edu/

National Museum of African Art aims to inspire conversations about the beauty, power and diversity of African arts and cultures.

 http://www.nationalmuseumindia.gov.in

National Museum in New Delhi, India showcases a collection of objects of historical, cultural and artistic significance.

 http://mandelartgallery.com.au/

Mandel Art Gallery showcases a display of contemporary and traditional Aboriginal artworks.

 http://www.asianart.org

Asian Art Museum, San Francisco aims to encourage people to discover ‘the unique material, aesthetic, and intellectual achievements of Asian art and culture’.

http://www.centrepompidou.fr

The Centre Pompidou in Paris is the largest museum of modern art in Europe, and one of the most renowned in the world.

http://www.Musee-orsay.fr

Musée d’Orsay in Paris houses the largest collection of impressionist and post-impressionist masterpieces in the world by painters including Monet, Manet, Degas, Renoir, Cézanne, Seurat, Sisley, Gauguin and Van Gogh.

Three things you can do to support you child

1, Help them to have access to different forms of research; this can be use of a camera, access to the internet, visiting the library.

2, Encourage them to persevere with homework tasks and to seek support from their teacher before the due in date if they are struggling.

3, Help them to look at the world around them with fresh eyes, look at everyday objects like an artist investigating an object before drawing it.

Intent

Most people are fascinated by the night sky and are interested in stories about our continuing exploration of our Solar System and Universe. This course has been developed to build on that interest and to give an introduction to the subject of astronomy. The course will enable students to understand our position in the Universe, the movements of planets and stars, the cycles in the night and daytime sky, and the way in which we use technology to observe and interact with space. Students will follow an incredible story of how scientists, from ancient civilisations to the modern day, have used their imagination and carefully recorded visual measurement to explore the Universe in which we live.

Year 10 Content

Chapter 1 – Planet Earth

Chapter 2 – Celestial Observation

Chapter 3 – The Lunar Disc

Chapter 4 – Exploration of The Moon

Chapter 5 – Exploring the Solar System

Chapter 6 – Solar System Observation

Chapter 7 – Early Models of The Solar System

Chapter 8 – Planetary Motion and Gravity

Chapter 9 – Solar Astronomy

Chapter 10 – The Earth – Moon – Sun System

Chapter 11 – Time and The Earth-Moon-Sun cycles

 

Year 11 Content

Chapter 12 – Formation of the planetary systems

Chapter 13 – Exploring Starlight

Chapter 14 – Stellar Evolution

Chapter 15 – Our Place in the Galaxy

Chapter 16 – Cosmology (including Hubble’s Law)

 

Course details

Exam Board – Edexcel

Specification/QAN – 1AS0

Qualification – GCSE

Assessment – 1 x paper, 1 hour and 45 minutes. The assessment consists of 10 questions, and is out of 100 marks. The paper will include multiple-choice, short-answer questions, calculations, graphical and extended-open-response questions.

Useful websites:

Exam Specification

Online stellarium software 

3 things to help your child:

  • Download Google Sky or a similar smartphone app and have conversations about the night sky
  • Discuss current news stories relating to celestial discoveries, missions and events (such as meteor showers and eclipses) as they occur
  • When the days are short and it gets dark earlier, take the opportunity to go outside to a low light area and explore the night sky.

 

Intent

Your passion may be making videos, designing buildings, or playing football. Whatever your skill set and interests, there is a business side to the equation. Business is part of the language we use when we talk about the entertainment industry, the construction industry, and sports industry. Everything has a “business” aspect to it — every industry needs accountants, marketers, managers, financial analysts, creatives, operational organisers, and technology support staff... in other words, business always matters! So whether you are planning to enter the world of fashion, film or finance; carpentry, care-giving or catering; mechanics, medicine or media (and everything in-between), the study of business can open a world of possibilities for you!

Writing a convincing report, preparing a brilliant CV, presenting a winning pitch, or even just drafting the right email, requires excellent communication skills which studying business will allow you to develop. Business students gain an insight into why people work and what motivates them, allowing you to manage other people effectively and get the most out of those around you, in any context. Making an idea or a job application stand out from the competition is no easy task, but a basic understanding of marketing will teach you to know your audience, and how you can creatively appeal to them. Many great businesses fail to succeed due to poor financial management. Studying business will take you through the basics of managing finance so you are confident and equipped to help a business thrive in whatever role you have within it. It can give you a good grasp of basic economic principles, how markets are affected by world events, and how to access the right financial advice when you need it, whether you’re an entrepreneur running your own business, part of a corporation or involved in the public sector. 

Studying business will set you up for any future imaginable!

Key Stage 4

Over the two years, we study a range of business topics grouped into two distinct Themes. The topics in the second theme, which is largely studied in Year 11, build on students’ understanding gained during the first year.

Theme 1 Investigating Small Business
  • Enterprise and entrepreneurs
  • Spotting an opportunity
  • Putting a business idea into practice
  • Making the business effective
  • Understanding external influences on business
Theme 2 Building a Business
  • Growing the business
  • Making marketing decisions
  • Making operational decisions
  • Making financial decisions
  • Making human resource decisions
Assessment

The GCSE is assessed in two written examination papers, one for each Theme, both worth 50% of the final grade.

The exam papers comprise a combination of short-answer and more extended answer questions. The first section of both papers tests the students’ business knowledge in a general sense, whereas the questions in the remaining two sections are centred on a range of specific business contexts given to students as Case Study material in the examination paper.

Supporting Information

Useful Web Sites

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/subjects/

www.businessed.co.uk/

3 things you can do to support your child

1. Follow news items together and talk about the different impacts that the top stories are having on businesses of different sizes and in different industries

2. Ask them to explain business concepts to you and give you examples from real-life of those concepts; speaking and explaining is a POWERFUL way to reinforce their own understanding

3. Test them on their business key terms definitions. This knowledge forms the building blocks from which they will craft their exam answers, and is ABSOLUTELY critical to their success

 

Intent

Dance has the power to transform the experience of young people’s lives, not only in unlocking progress through education but also personally in and beyond school life. Dance is a distinct art form and connects across other art forms and subjects. But not forgetting, Dance is also a very popular and fun physical activity among young people. It gives them access to a unique mode of learning, expression and communication.

Here we believe that through Dance students can widen their aspirations and achieve their full potential as successful learners, confident artists and responsible citizens. Dance is a creative activity that uses kinaesthetic mode (bodily movement) with imagination in its creating, performing and watching. It complements other forms of intelligence and provides a vehicle for students to physically express and communicate their emotions, ideas, identify, culture, and their understanding about themselves, others and the society in which they live.

Students access Dance as a core artistic discipline and will develop skills in physical interaction, team working, problem solving, observing, critical thinking, verbal and non-verbal communication, design in space, musicality and creativity. There are many personal and social benefits to the study of Dance, such as improving self-esteem and confidence as well as promoting general wellbeing, physical fitness and healthy attitudes to the body and lifestyle choices.

Dance is a continuously growing and developing industry, it is prevalent in our culture and society today on many television programmes, in movies, on the internet as well as the theatre. We hope to encourage a lifelong interest and love of the creative art of Dance as well as emphasize the scope of opportunity and employability in the industry, not only in performance but also the administration and production roles.

Key Stage 3

Students will have access to Dance as part of the PE curriculum throughout Key Stage 3 as well as the opportunity to join in extra-curricular clubs. These activities will introduce them to various styles of Dance including Contemporary, Lyrical, Jazz, Hip Hop and Musical Theatre, as well as enhance their general dance ability and skills. Through these activities students may also have the opportunity to represent the school in local Dance festivals and performances.

Year 7 Information

Students will begin by exploring the four key elements of choreography: action, space, dynamics and relationships. This will be a guided exploration giving students the opportunity to begin to develop their creativity. Performance skills will also be introduced such as focus, projection and musicality. The main style of Dance studied is Contemporary however influences from other styles will be explored in lessons.

Year 8 Information

Students will evolve their knowledge and understanding of the key elements of choreography through more sophisticated creative based activities known as Motif Development. Performance skills will be highlighted in greater detail to understand what skills a dancer requires in order to deliver an exceptional performance. They will also learn about physical skills, particularly co-ordination, balance and strength. This is to help them understand that a dancer must have a high level of fitness in different areas to be a successful performer in the Dance industry.

Year 9 Information

Stimuli is introduced as a starting point to create choreography using motif development and other choreographic devices. Students begin to develop a deeper understanding and question why movement is created and how it is performed in order to express the theme, intention or story to an audience. They will also investigate further into physical and performance skills being introduced to the concept of technique. This is all essential knowledge and understanding for students to have gained if they desire to study Dance to a higher level at GCSE.

Key Stage 4

Students who choose to study BTEC Dance in Year 10 and 11 will have both theoretical and practical based sessions. Both sessions will cover and support learning from different aspects of each component. In all components students will be assessed according to criteria assessing their theoretical and practical performance. This qualification gives learners the opportunity to develop sector-specific knowledge and skills in a practical learning environment.

Year 10 Information

Students will complete two of the three components of this course during their first year of study, Component 1: Exploring the Performing Arts and Component 2: Developing Skills and Techniques in the Performing Arts. Both of these components are designed to relate to the Dance industry sector through realistic tasks and activities. The style of assessment promotes deep learning through ensuring connection between knowledge and practice.

In Component 1

In this unit of work, students will examine professional practitioners’ performance work and explore the interrelationships between different features of performance, as well as developing an understanding of the skills and responsibilities of both performing and non-performing jobs roles within the Dance industry.

In Component 2

Students will develop skills and techniques for Dance performance and learn in greater depth how to apply these in rehearsal and performance. They will focus on the genre of Contemporary Dance and will work to enhance their physical skills in technique exercises, as well as their performance skills by individually learning and performing a section of repertoire from a professional Dance production. Over the course of the year, students will track their progress and review their development and contribution to the rehearsal process and in performance.

Year 11 Information

The final component of the course, Component 3: Responding to a Brief, will be the focus of the second year of study on this course. This is an externally assessed unit of work and builds directly on Components 1 and 2 which enables learning to be brought together and related to a real-life situation.

In Component 3

This unit of work focuses on students working in groups to create a performance piece in response to a brief. The students will learn to understand how to respond to a brief, selecting and developing appropriate skills and techniques whilst work within a group to apply these by creating a performance. In addition to the practical section of the exam, students will also be required to produce written logs detailing their ideas and skills used within the rehearsal period to create the performance. Finally students will evaluate the development process and outcome of their performance.

Assessment Breakdown

Students are graded on Pass, Merit and Distinction levels.

Component 1 – Internal assessment (36 guided learning hours)
Component 2 – Internal assessment (36 guided learning hours)
Component 3 – External assessment (48 guided learning hours)

Useful Websites

Professional Work One – Christopher Bruce Shadows

https://vimeo.com/225398876

 

Professional Work Two – Andrew Winghart Cry Me A River

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-I-SE6Q9Le0

 

Professional Work Three – Kenrick Sandy Emancipation of Expressionism

https://vimeo.com/225398249

 

Pearson Qualifications BTEC Tech Awards Performing Arts

https://qualifications.pearson.com/en/qualifications/btec-tech-awards/performing-arts.html

 

One Dance UK – the industry body and subject association for dance.

https://www.onedanceuk.org/

 

South East Dance (Oxfordshire, Surrey, Berkshire, Kent, East Sussex and West Sussex)

https://www.southeastdance.org.uk/

 

Arts Council England

https://www.artscouncil.org.uk/

 

BBC Bitesize Dance Factfile

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/guides/z3hhycw/revision/1

 

BBC Bitesize Dance Essential Skills and Techniques

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/guides/zgnn39q/revision/1

Intent

Technological progress is inevitable. From the day humans discovered fire, manufactured tools or created the wheel they were on an unstoppable path to technological advancement. Our intent is to aspire future generations of Engineers, Product Designers, Mechanics, Project Managers and Architects to name but a few. We believe that Design and Technology promotes a wide range of skills that last a lifetime from practical problem solving to innovation, both of which play a huge part in improving human existence and making the world a better place for everyone!

Students have the opportunity to be creative and hands on; to develop good practical skills that will be with them for life; to solve real life problems; to learn planning and time management skills; to gather an awareness of user requirements; to work to find solutions and to be given the opportunity, experience and tools, from an early age, to succeed in designing and making high quality outcomes. Design and Technology can give students a huge sense of accomplishment and confidence in their capabilities.

The practical nature of the subject gives students the opportunity to design, develop, create and test a product that they have designed in response to a set brief. We are strong believers that students learn best by ‘doing’ and by allowing them to experiment and take risks, in a safe and positive learning environment. This is achieved through enthusiastic teaching that embraces new technologies, whilst retaining the best of traditional practices. At the heart of this, is the desire to deliver a curriculum in which students produce high quality outcomes.

Key Stage 3

Students will have 3 lessons every 2 weeks during Year 7, 8 and 9 for approximately 1 term.

Year 7 Information

Students will complete an introductory lesson highlighting the health and safety practices required for safe working conditions in the workshop environment, the foundations for their Key Stage 3 and Key Stage 4 experience. They will be taught a variety of skills required for investigating, designing and evaluating future projects.

The students are tasked with an exciting project to initiate their creative minds, with the opportunity to design and develop a pencil pot, for the Design and Technology classrooms in the new school build.

The topics we cover include:

  • Health and safety
  • Tools and machinery
  • Isometric drawing techniques
  • Tonal shading and rendering
  • Product analysis
  • Specification
  • Initial ideas
  • Design development
  • Evaluating design concepts

8 Information

Practical skills and a range of visualisation techniques will underpin Year 8. 

Students will explore topics which build on prior knowledge and learn skills which will prepare them for Design and Technology at Key Stage 4. Students will experience an enterprise task that allows them to investigate, design and manufacture a key tag for a specific end-user.

The topics we cover include: 

  • Customer needs/requirements
  • Existing product research
  • CAD/CAM
  • Polymer sources and properties
  • Design visualisation
  • Quality control/assurance
  • Modelling techniques
  • Evaluating design concepts 

Year 9 Information

Students will further explore topics which will increase their prior knowledge and develop skills that prepare them for Design and Technology at Key Stage 4. Students will be provided with a contextual brief from the teacher in which they will independently be able to investigate, design, manufacture and evaluate a product within limitations to suit their target market.

The topics we cover include:

  • Investigating a problem
  • Primary data gathering
  • Creating a design brief
  • Specification
  • Design visualisation
  • Manufacturing log
  • Modelling techniques
  • The work of others
  • Evaluating outcomes

Key Stage 4

Students who choose to study Design and Technology in Year 10 and 11 will have 6 lessons every 2 weeks

Year 10 Information

Students will have the opportunity to develop a variety of skills, including research, teamwork, organisation, time management, planning, design communication, visualisation and problem solving while learning theory alongside mini practical projects.

Theory units they will learn about:

  • New and emerging technologies
  • Energy, materials, systems and devices
  • Materials and their working properties
  • Specialist technical principles
  • Timber based materials
  • Polymer based materials
  • Designing principles
  • Making principles

Practical projects:

  • Techno-Olympics challenge
  • CAD/CAM Christmas decoration
  • Key tag production line
  • Desk tidy mini NEA
  • Quality control and assurance testing
  • Easter POS project

The Non-examination assessment is introduced in the summer term of Year 10 where students are provided with a contextual challenge from the exam board.  In the final term, they will be tasked with researching into one of three contextual challenges ahead of designing and making their project in Year 11.

Year 11 Information

The Non-examination assessment is continued from Year 10, this is where students become independent project managers taking products from concept to reality and making links with real world contexts when designing, testing, manufacturing and evaluating a final product that they have personally created.

Revision is taught through recapping the theory learnt throughout their Design and Technology experiences from KS3 to Year 11 in preparation for the exam in the summer term. The use of fun revision activities incorporated into lessons such as Snakes and Ladders, Connect 4 and small ‘Dragon’s Den’ style projects are used to make revision lessons engaging and beneficial to link the theory required for the exam to real world context and case studies.

Assessment

Exam (2-hour) – 50% of overall qualification

Non-Examination Assessment – 50% of overall qualification

Supporting Information

Useful Web Sites

http://www.technologystudent.com/

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC62Ngsd_ZBWkX-6yFV-10UQ

https://www.jamesdysonfoundation.co.uk/

3 things you can do to support your child

  1. Actively speak to them about the project they are currently working on, provide suggestions and feedback as this could contribute to their iterative design process.
  2. Encourage them to be actively engaged with the homework tasks set from Design and Technology, which are set to develop and deepen your child’s understanding of the subject.
  3. Support their reading development by having books or magazines in the home and let your child see you and other family members reading them.
Intent

Economics is about people and their economic choices. Economics shows students that we are all part of the economy and that economics relates to every aspect of our lives - from the decisions of individuals or families to the structures created by governments and producers. It develops their understanding of how economic issues affect choices about resources and markets and vice versa.

Economics equips students with the skills and confidence to explore how consumers, producers and governments interact in markets nationally and internationally.

Students will gain transferrable skills that will benefit them in their further study and employment:

  • By learning how to use economic data from a range of sources, such as tables, charts and graphs, students will acquire the skills to make informed judgements and to communicate in a clear and concise way.
  • By learning how to explain and evaluate economic problems and possible solutions, students will acquire a way of thinking as economists and develop a logical approach to thinking and reasoning.

Key Stage 4

Over the two years, we study a range of economic topics grouped into two distinct Components.

Component 1: Introduction to economics

Students are introduced to fundamental economic terms and concepts and apply them to explain how markets work in contemporary and historical economic contexts. They study the roles of the main economic agents, how they interact, and the importance of financial markets.

There are two topics:

  • Introduction to economics
  • The role of markets and money 

Component 2: National and international economics

Students develop their understanding of how governments aim to achieve economic objectives and the effects of economic policies on markets, as well as the importance and impact of international trade.

There are two topics:

  • Economic objectives and the role of government
  • International trade and the global economy

In both components students are encouraged to evaluate the moral, ethical and sustainability issues that arise from economic activity.

Assessment

The GCSE is assessed in two written examination papers, one for each component, both worth 50% of the final grade.

The exam papers comprise a combination of multiple choice, short-answer and more extended answer questions. The first section of both papers tests the students’ business knowledge in a general sense, whereas the questions in the remaining two sections are centred on a range of specific economic contexts given to students as Case Study material in the examination paper.

Supporting Information

Useful Web Sites

Ideally, it’s best to read a wide variety of newspapers and their columnists, for example:

By reading widely, not only will you find out about the different perspectives that the papers have, but you’ll also develop a wider understanding of the topic you’re reading about, whether that’s fiscal policy or the global economy.

3 things you can do to support your child

  1. Follow news items together and talk about the different economic impacts that the top stories are having
  2. Ask them to explain economics concepts to you and give you examples from real-life of those concepts; speaking and explaining is a POWERFUL way to reinforce their own understanding
  3. Test them on their economic key terms definitions. This knowledge forms the building blocks from which they will craft their exam answers, and is ABSOLUTELY critical to their success

 Intent

Engineering is a driving force in the UK’s economy, accounting for 21.4% (£1.2 trillion) of the UK’s £5.7 trillion turnover. From everyday things like your mobile, computer and clothes to medicine, space, national security and renewable energy to tackling climate change, providing clean drinking water or ensuring sustainable food supplies. Almost everything you eat, wear, use involves engineering. There are loads, some are general and some are specialized. The general ones include: Mechanical Engineering concentrating on manufacturing, design and maintenance of mechanical systems. Another is Electrical and Electronic engineering; this is a crucial type of engineering which focuses on small circuits and electrical power supplies. Specialized types of engineering include: Civil Engineering for construction of roads, bridges, buildings railways and waterworks, Automotive Engineering for making cars or being a mechanic by fixing them, Aerospace Engineering for planes, Biomedical Engineering for medical tools and developing replacement body parts or Mechatronics Engineering for making robots. Students are given the opportunity to develop their creative, technical and practical skills through a series of product investigation, design and manufacturing activities.   

Engineering is a wide-ranging subject with theoretical parts and design and making parts where 2D designs and ideas can be transformed into 3D outcomes. Students are encouraged to be individual and to develop both drawing and practice marking out and making skills using metal and wood working tools and to explore solutions through a range of different materials. Engineering offers an experience that focuses on learning through application, i.e. acquiring and applying knowledge, skills and understanding through tasks set in sector or subject contexts from the world of Engineering and that have many of the characteristics of real work. The course contains a balance of development and knowledge requirements some of which is theoretical and the demonstration of practical skills.  

Students will make use of the facilities provided in the Design and Technology and Engineering Department to carry out any practical activities. The qualification has been designed to build on the skills, knowledge and understanding acquired at Key Stage 3, and utilize them at KS4. The skills developed include literacy, numeracy, use of technology and design.  

Throughout KS3 students will build their skills in designing, developing ideas and making through a series of projects which will introduce them to new machines and processes, enabling them to understand their own preferences and expertise should they take Engineering into KS4.  

Year 7 Information 

Students will complete an introductory lesson highlighting the health and safety practices required for safe working conditions in the workshop environment, the foundations for their Key Stage 3 and Key Stage 4 experience. Students will complete the design and make task with the outcome of a steady hand game. 

The topics we cover include:  
  • Health and safety
  • Tools and machinery
  • Orthographic Drawing 
  • Investigate electronic options 
  • Product analysis
  • Customer needs/requirements 
  • Specification
  • Initial ideas
  • Design development
  • Evaluating design concepts
 Year 8 Information 

Practical skills and a range of activities to build their skills in designing, developing ideas and planning for production will underpin Year 8. Students will explore topics which build on prior knowledge and learn skills which will prepare them for Design and Technology at Key Stage 4. Students will complete the design and make task with the outcome of a Sustainable Rocket Powered Model Car. 

 The topics we cover include: 
  • Customer needs/requirements 
  • Existing product research
  • CAD 
  • Modelling techniques
  • Velocity Speed Time
  • Evaluating design concepts
 Year 9 Information 

Students will further explore topics which will increase their prior knowledge and develop skills that prepare them for Design and Technology at Key Stage 4. Students will be provided with a contextual brief from the teacher in which they will independently be able to complete the design and make task with the outcome of a Mobile Phone Holder. 

 The topics we cover include:  
  • Investigating a problem
  • Primary data gathering
  • Polymer Properties
  • Creating a design brief
  • CAD/CAM
  • Manufacturing log
  • Modelling techniques
  • Evaluating outcomes  
 Key Stage 4 Course Description 

The course contains a balance of development and knowledge requirements some of which is theoretical and the demonstration of practical skills. Students will make use of the facilities provided in the Design and Technology Department to carry out any practical activities. The qualification has been designed to build on the skills, knowledge and understanding acquired at Key Stage 3, particularly skills related to literacy, numeracy, use of technology and design.  

The Level 1/2 Award in Engineering provides a more practical alternative to GCSE. The qualification is based around the world of engineering and aims to introduce students to the various strands available within the field. The qualification has been devised around the concept of a ‘plan, do, review’ approach to learning which mirrors engineering production and design processes. The qualification offers students the chance to develop knowledge, skills and understanding through tasks set in realistic work-related contexts. The subject has Maths and Science woven throughout, and at GCSE there are questions that require a good level of understanding in both, with mathematical components applied to engineering situations. Level 1/2 awards in Engineering prepare students for Post-16 further education or the world of work by instilling the key theoretical and practical skills needed. We are committed through our vocational/skills-based curriculum to equip all students, whether leaving us at KS3 or KS4, with not only a set of essential life skills but also a passion for the subject. 

 Year 10 

Theory for Unit 3 throughout the year: 

  • Drawing Skills to create Portfolio
  • 3rd Angle Orthographic Projection Sectional Views
  • Isometric Drawing
  • also marking out and practical experience

 Unit 1: First Controlled assessment:  

  • Reverse engineer a relevant product for analysis. 
  • Product Modelling:
  • Modelling products relevant to tasks.
 Year 11 

Theory for Unit 3 throughout the year: 

Unit 2: Second controlled assessment, Manufacture a component 

Machining & Tooling assessment task following teacher/WJEC set criteria. 

Resources (Brief, Drawings etc. to be supplied) 

 All focus areas will contribute towards the development of Basic Key Skills in Communication, Application of number, ICT, Working with others, Improving Own Performance and Problem Solving. 

  • Unit 1 Engineering Design (30 Guided Learning Hours) an in-depth analysis of an existing product, covering theory and materials and manufacturing processes used, followed by the design of a similar product using 3D CAD.
  • Unit 2 Producing Engineered Products (60 Guided Learning Hours) Manufacture a product using secondary machining processes, learning to use processes to work within a given tolerance in the workshop.
  • Unit 3 Solving Engineering Problems (30 Guided Learning Hours) Theory Exam 1 ½ hours with questions covering the entire content of the specification including processes covered in Units 1 and 2 and revealing the student’s depth of knowledge in Engineering related issues.
  • Graded Level 1 Pass, Level 2 Pass, Level 2 Merit and Level 2 Distinction.

 

Useful Web Sites: 

http://accessfm.com/ http://www.bpf.co.uk/Plastipedia/Default.aspxhttp://www.roymech.co.uk/Useful_Tables/Drawing/Drawing.html 

http://www.roymech.co.uk/Useful_Tables/Drawing/Electical_Control_symbols.htmlhttp://www.estfoundations.com/background3-basic%20project%20skills-sketching.html http://www.me.umn.edu/courses/me2011/handouts/drawing/blanco-tutorial.htmlhttp://l2teautomotive.wikispaces.com/file/view/ENGINEERING+SKETCHING+INFORMATIO N+SHEETS+MEL02INF2430+v1.1.pdf 

http://www.design-technology.org/metalspresentation.ppthttp://www.designandtech.com/ http://www.technologystudent.com/http://www.btinternet.com/~hognosesam/gcse/ http://www.sda-uk.org/ 

http://www.stepin.org/ http://www.dtonline.org/ 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/design/ http://www.howstuffworks.com/http://www.animatedworksheets.co.uk/http://www.btinternet.com/~hognosesam/gcse/ http://www.design-technology.org/tvs.htm http://www.gcseinengineering.com/http://ergonomics4schools.com/ 

3 things you can do to support your child: 
  1. Support them by enabling them to visit museums and art galleries. 
  2. Encourage them to take an interest in different designers, artists and Textile artists. 
  3. Encourage your child to complete all homework tasks to a high standard.  

 

 

 

 Intent 

Being literate and able to communicate with others are core skills that all students need to develop. Here at The Warwick School we want to support students in cultivating a love for the written and spoken word and an ability to share their own opinions and passions in an eloquent and considered manner. 

Our schemes of learning are based on the development of key English skills through engaging and creative lessons. Students will study a variety of fiction and non-fiction texts that broaden and challenge their perceptions of the wider world as well as having the opportunity to explore their own ideas through creative and functional writing tasks. We also embed opportunities for students to develop their spoken language to ensure the development of lifelong skills. 

It is our ambition to ensure that all approach their final assessments with confidence and a will to succeed. 

Key Stage 3  

At Key Stage 3 lessons will often include time spent in the school library to foster a love of reading for pleasure and to allow wider reading around the subject. 

Year 7 Information 

In Year 7, we aim to bridge the gap between Key Stage 2 and Key Stage 3 curriculums by focusing on analysing written texts and writing for a variety of different purposes and audiences. The topics we cover include: 

  • ‘War Horse’ by Michael Morpurgo (both reading and creative writing skills)
  • Writing to Argue and Persuade
  • Sherlock Holmes and other murder mystery short stories
  • An introduction to Shakespeare
  • Non-fiction reading skills to include a variety of texts including food, sport and biographies.

 

Year 8 Information 

In Year 8, students consolidate the skills they have learnt in Year 7 but also begin to consider the impact of context on an author and the texts they write as well as how to use their spoken language to influence others. The topics we cover include: 

  • ‘Of Mice and Men’ by John Steinbeck (both reading and creative writing skills)
  • Speaking and Listening – students prepare a presentation to share with their class
  • Media genres including a study of James Bond and the film ‘Casino Royale’
  • Unseen poetry focusing on an anthology of our teacher’s favourite poems
  • A modern play
 Year 9 Information 

In Year 9, students continue to develop the skills required for GCSE though no content is taught at this point to ensure students continue to explore new genres and ideas. The topics we cover include: 

  • The gothic genre and Mary Shelley’s ‘Frankenstein’ (both reading and creative writing skills)
  • Writing to argue and persuade
  • Non-fiction reading skills exploring contemporary, controversial issues
  • Poetry on the theme of ‘Identity’
  • Gender and relationships in Shakespeare’s ‘Macbeth’
Key Stage 4  

All students will study both GCSE English Language and English Literature.

Year 10 Information 

Students predominately focus on the GCSE English Literature course which gives students the opportunity to develop and debate different interpretations, study how an author uses language, structure and form for effect and explore the ways context can shape a text. Students currently study the following units for the AQA specification: 

  • ‘Romeo & Juliet’ by William Shakespeare
  • ‘Dr Jekyll & Mr Hyde’ by Robert Louis Stevenson
  • ‘An Inspector Calls’ by J.B. Priestley
  • Power & Conflict Poetry
  • Unseen Poetry

Students in Year 10 will also complete the Spoken Language component of their GCSE English Language in which they will deliver a presentation on a topic of their choice and answer questions from their audience. 

Year 11 Information 

Students will continue to revise GCSE English Literature whilst also developing the skills required for GCSE English Language. This course offers students an opportunity to read a wide range of fiction and non-fiction extracts as well as develop core communication skills through their written work. Students will prepare for the following units within the AQA specification: 

  • Reading and responding to unseen fiction extracts
  • Creative and narrative writing
  • Reading, responding and comparing unseen non-fiction extracts
  • Writing to argue and persuade
Assessment 

All assessment is exam based (with the exception of the spoken language NEA which is separately endorsed). 

Students sit a total of 4 English exams at the end of Year 11: 2 for GCSE Literature and 2 for GCSE Language. 

Useful Web Sites 

www.schoolreadinglist.co.uk  

www.bitesize.co.uk 

www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/english  

3 things you can do to support your child: 
  1. Encourage your child to read widely and as much as possible.  
  2. Discuss and debate interesting topics, news items and issues with your child.  
  3. Take your child to the theatre, museums and on days out to give them a range of experiences. 

 

With the OCR National in Marketing and Enterprise, students can explore what it means to set up and run a business enterprise, as well as develop key employability skills and explore potential careers.

The qualification enables students to develop their technical skills such as market research skills, planning, promotional and financial skills using realistic business scenarios, as well as personal skills including time management and problem solving. 

Over the duration of the course, students will:

  • develop an understanding of business concepts, business terminology, business objectives, the integrated nature of business activity and the impact of business on individuals and wider society;
  • develop as enterprising individuals with the ability to think commercially and creatively;
  • investigate and analyse real business opportunities and issues;
  • develop problem-solving and decision-making skills relevant to business;
  • investigate, analyse and evaluate business opportunities and issues;
  • develop and apply quantitative (mathematical) skills relevant to business, including using and interpreting data;
  • develop as effective and independent students, and as critical and reflective thinkers with enquiring minds.

Where next

This course is useful if you wish to have a career in : Marketing, Recruitment, Finance, Accountancy, Business Administration, Teaching, Human Resource Management, Publishing, IT, Business Ownership, Entrepreneurship

 Intent 

Everyone needs to consume food on a daily basis; our intent is to develop an understanding of food, healthy eating, food purchasing, storage, preparation and making skills so that students can make informed decisions throughout their life about the type of food they consume. It is our aim to develop a love of all things culinary. 

Food is a creative, practical and fun subject. Students have the opportunity to be hands on and imaginative; to develop good practical skills that will be with them for life; to solve real life problems; to make edible products to take home and share with their family. This can give students a huge sense of achievement and self-worth. Studying Food helps students to adapt, be resourceful with finance and ingredients and be flexible making them more resilient to finding solutions to problems that occur in their lives. Working as a team in a practical environment makes students aware of others around them and helps to develop the skills of consideration, courtesy and communication.  

The practical nature of the subject gives students the opportunity to work with their hands and to develop fine manipulative skills. This suits all students and allows them to move around in lesson time, rather than to be confined by a desk. We aspire to encourage students to have fun in lessons and be driven by the excitement of learning new skills and using new equipment. Ingredients are provided by families.  

Key Stage 3  

Students will have lessons on rotation with other Technology subjects.

Year 7 Information 

Students will complete an introductory programme to basic cooking which will be the foundation for food lessons in Key Stage 3 and if taken as an option, Hospitality and Catering BTEC Level 1 and 2. They will have either a theory or practical lesson once per fortnight. Families are required to provide ingredients so that dishes can be taken home and enjoyed by all of the family. The topics we cover include: 

  • Nutrition  
  • Healthy eating  
  • Cooking utensils  
  • Hand held electrical equipment 
  • Cooking methods 
Year 8 Information 

Ingredients and a variety of cooking methods will underpin year 8.  

Students will explore topics which build on prior knowledge, and study topics which will prepare them for Hospitality and Catering at Key Stage 4. Students will be expected to engage in either theory or practical lessons once per fortnight. They will cook a selection of savoury or sweet dishes using several different cooking methods and a range of cooking techniques. The topics we cover include: 

  • Customer needs/requirements 
  • Health and safety  
  • Food safety  
  • Menu planning  
  • Production of dishes  
  • Commodities 
Year 9 Information 

Students will explore topics which build on prior knowledge, and study topics which will prepare them for Hospitality and Catering at Key Stage 4 should they wish to follow this path. Students will be expected to take part in practical work once per fortnight for the term they study Food. Increasingly, students will be required to select their own dishes to make with an emphasis on predominantly savoury foods. We encourage students to make from scratch and families are required to provide ingredients so that dishes can be taken home and enjoyed by all of the family. The topics we cover include: 

  • Nutrition  
  • Healthy Eating  
  • Diet Through Life  
  • Creating Production Plans for practical work to manage time effectively  
  • Food Commodities such as pasta, rice  
  • Functional and Chemical Properties of ingredients such as egg, fat, flour  
  • Development of Practical Skills such as pastry making  
Key  Stage 4  

Students can choose to study Hospitality and Catering in Year 10 and 11.

Year 10 Information 

Students will have the opportunity to develop a variety of skills, including food preparation and cooking skills, organisation, time management, planning, communication and problem solving. 

Success in this course will enable you to progress on to further training if they decide to choose a career in this industry. 

The course is made up of two units:  

Unit 1: Hospitality and Catering Industry Unit 2: Hospitality and Catering in Action 

In Unit 1 they will learn about:  
  • All the different parts of the Hospitality and Catering industry.  
  • Different types of hospitality and catering establishments and job roles. 
  • Different types of hospitality and catering provision for particular situations. 
  • Front of house and kitchen operations. 
  • The needs and requirements of customers. 
  • What makes hospitality and catering businesses successful. 
  • Issues related to nutrition and food safety. 
In Unit 2 

students will apply their learning in order to: 

Plan, prepare, cook and serve a variety of nutritional dishes, in a safe and hygienic manner, that are suitable for different situations and customer needs and requirements. 

Year 11 Information 

Subject knowledge for unit 1 needs to be complete in preparation for the summer written examination. 

Unit 2:  

  • Produce a written proposal.
  • Plan the production of dishes for a menu. 
  • Produce an annotated and dovetailed time plan for their chosen dishes.
  • Include teacher observation records/photographs. 

 

Assessment 

Unit 1. Hospitality and Catering industry – 40% External assessment 

Unit 2. Hospitality and Catering in Action – 60% Internal assessment: Controlled Assessment Task 

Supporting  Information 

Useful Web Sites 

www.nutrition.org.uk   

www.foodsafety.gov  

www.s-cool.co.uk  

3 things you can do to support your child: 
  1. Ensure that you provide your child with ingredients once every 2 weeks during the term they are studying food.  
  2. Encourage them to be involved in the production of meals in the home  
  3. Support their reading development by having recipe books or food magazines in the home and let your child see you and other family members reading them. 

 

 If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his language, that goes to his heart. - Nelson Mandela 

Intent

MFL plays a vital part in the curriculum. It helps to fire student's curiosity about the world around them. It is important for students to develop an awareness of the world around them and be able to communicate with people in their own language. By doing so students have a greater understanding of their own language and how is has been shaped. 

It is the department's belief that every pupil has the right to study MFL. At Key Stage Three it is compulsory students will study French or Spanish and at Key Stage Four it is left to the individual students to decide whether or not they wish to pursue the subject. 

The study of MFL should aim to create a spirit of harmony and tolerance. It should seek to explain the differences but also emphasise the similarities. MFL has a part to play in the creation of a just and equitable society. Moreover, the department will promote this through a balanced curriculum, which seeks to spark an enjoyment in discovering other languages and cultures. 

The department also has a role to play in providing genuine academic enjoyment. It is also, therefore, the remit of the department to produce thoughtful and stimulating lessons which access a wide range of teaching and learning methods. 

Finally, it is essential that the work that the students undertake in this subject should create and enforce an intellectual discipline that students will carry with them to other areas of study and furnish them with analytical, evaluative and literacy skills which will help them in later life. 

Key Stage 3

Year 7 Information 

Students will complete an introductory programme to French, there is no requirement to have any previous knowledge. All lessons will be based around the four skills listening, reading, speaking and writing.  The topics we cover include: 

  • Talking about yourself  
  • School  
  • My free time  
  • My family life  
  • My town  
 Year 8 Information 

Students will build on the knowledge they gained in Year 7, more grammar will be introduced and we work on different tenses.  We will continue to work on the four skills listening, reading, speaking and writing developing confidence. The topics we cover include: 

  • Holidays  
  • Festivals and celebrations  
  • Leisure time  
  • Where we live  
  • Sport 
 Year 9 Information 

Students will build on the knowledge they gained in Year 7 and 8, they will begin to be able to express themselves in different tenses, with increasing fluency and confidence.  The lessons will continue to be based on the four key skills listening, reading, speaking and writing.  Students will begin to write and speak at length and can understand longer passages in spoken and written French.  The topics we cover include: 

  • Social time 
  • Healthy living  
  • The future world of work  
  • Holidays  
  • World issues  

Key Stage 4

 Students can choose to study GCSE French in Year 10 and 11.

 Year 10 Information 

Students will begin their AQA GCSE course, they will build on what they have learnt at Key Stage Three and apply the grammar and vocabulary in a more complex way.  As before the students will work on the four different skills listening, reading, speaking and writing. Success in this course can lead to many different avenues including travel and tourism, working in a global company or journalism. 

The course is based on three themes. 

 In Theme 1 ‘Identity and culture’ they will learn about:  

  • Relationships with Family and Friends
  • Marriage and partnership
  • Social media
  • Technology
  • Music, cinema and TV
  • Food and eating out
  • Sport
  • French customs
  • French festivals

 In Theme 2 ‘Local, national, international and global areas of interest’ they will learn about:  

  • Home
  • Where I live
  • Charity and voluntary work
  • Healthy and Unhealthy living

 

Year 11 Information 

Students will continue deepening their knowledge of the French language they will complete Theme 2 and Theme 3. 

In Theme 2 ‘Local, national, international and global areas of interest’ they will learn about:  

  • The environment
  • Poverty and homelessness
  • Holidays and Travel

  In Theme 3 ‘Current and future study and employment’ they will learn about: 

  • School and subjects
  • Life at school and college
  • University or work?
  • Choice of career

 Assessment 

The GCSE is assessed in four exams Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking - all worth 25% 

 

Supporting Information

Useful Web Sites 

www.wordreference.com 

www.duolingo.com 

www.conjuguemos.com 

 3 things you can do to support your child: 
  1. Foster an interest in all things Francophone.  Can they name all the French speaking countries? Talk about French culture, food, sport, music etc.  
  2. Encourage your child to have a go, for many this will be a new subject, encourage them to be involved in the lessons and encourage them when doing their homework.  Maybe download the Duolingo app and start learning French too!  
  3. Support with your child’s homework by testing them on vocabulary and grammar, this will help boost their confidence.

 

 

 

Intent 

A high-quality geography education should inspire in students a curiosity and fascination about the world and its people that will remain with them for the rest of their lives. Teaching should equip students with knowledge about diverse places, people, resources, natural and human environments, together with a deep understanding of the Earth’s key physical and human processes. As students' progress, their growing knowledge about the world should help them to deepen their understanding of the interaction between physical and human processes, and of the formation and use of landscapes and environments. Geographical knowledge, understanding and skills provide the frameworks and approaches that explain how the Earth’s features at different scales are shaped, interconnected and change over time.  

The geography aims are to ensure that all students:  
  • develop contextual knowledge of the location of globally significant places – both terrestrial and marine – including their defining physical and human characteristics and how these provide a geographical context for understanding the actions of processes.  
  • understand the processes that give rise to key physical and human geographical features of the world, how these are interdependent and how they bring about spatial variation and change over time. 
  • are competent in the geographical skills needed to:  
  • collect, analyse and communicate with a range of data gathered through experiences of fieldwork that deepen their understanding of geographical processes  
  • interpret a range of sources of geographical information, including maps, diagrams, globes, aerial photographs and Geographical Information Systems (GIS)  
  • communicate geographical information in a variety of ways, including through maps, numerical and quantitative skills and writing at length.
Key Stage 3 
Year 7 Information 

Students will complete an engaging and varied content at year 7 exploring aspects of the physical, human and environmental world at a variety of scales.  The units are designed to introduce students to the Geographical skills that underpin the latter years, examples including fieldwork collection and data presentation and analysis within the immediate locality.  Other key skills include an introduction to mapping and the various skills needed to interpret and read OS maps, whilst within the variety of topics students will engage in current issues, construct balanced arguments and debate key ideas.   

The topics we cover include: 
  • Jigsaw Earth
  • Rivers & Glaciers 
  • India & it’s slums
  • Mapping 
  • UK landscapes 
Year 8 Information 

During the second year we venture a little further afield, exploring issues in a variety of regions and ecosystems around the world.  Introducing the concept of sustainability and indigenous groups living in harmony with their surroundings whilst exploring the threats to their traditions, culture and ultimately way of life.  Towards the end of the year, within the topics of weather and climate, students undertake their second piece of fieldwork, measuring the subtle changes in microclimates.  This enquiry, around the school grounds, broadens skills learnt in year 7, adding mathematical concepts to data analysis and presentation skills.   

The topics we cover include: 
  • Africa
  • Development 
  • Rainforest Brazil
  • Middle East
  • Weather 
  • Globalisation
Year 9 Information 

Year 9 really is designed to help the students decide upon whether geography is a viable option for them as a GCSE.  During the latter stages of year 8 but more readily in year 9 assessments take on the format of GCSE style questions and the skills further developed to prepare the youngsters for the GCSE course.  The various topics will challenge them intellectually, make them see and consider the world in ways that may be new to them. The fieldwork here in year 9 involves an enquiry into the local area with the students completing their own pieces of individual data collection. 

Topics in year 9 include  
  • Plate tectonics & tsunami
  • Russia
  • Climate change 
  • Coasts
  • Population 
Key Stage 4  

The KS4 Geography course comprises 3 distinct areas. Firstly, there are the global issues, secondly aspects of UK Geography, exploring the past and present of our Isles considering both human and physical topics and finally a requirement that students have an in-depth understanding of global ecosystems and the variety of threats to them at local and global scales. The variety of skills delivered in Geography make it a subject that makes links with so many other aspects of the curriculum.  We have a range of numeracy skills from simple mathematical functions to data presentation in various graph formats, linked to art we expect students to complete labelled diagrams as well as field sketches.  The links to history and English include the extraction of information from sources and finally there is the expectation to write both single word answers and a page of text with a balanced argument and compelling conclusions. We are one of the few subjects that still requires the completion of coursework with 2 pieces undertaken over the 2 years.  

In Unit 1 students will learn about:  
  • The hazardous Earth includes a study of both tectonic and climatic hazards, their impacts on communities and the science trying to understand their occurrence. 
  • Development dynamics explores the variety of issues as to why levels of development vary across regions and within countries, with a detailed focus on Mumbai.   
  • Challenges of the urbanizing world looks at the wealth of problems associated with population growth and its impacts on communities, authorities and ecosystems. 
In Unit 2 students will learn about:  
  • The UKs evolving landscape explores the origins of our island, how we got here and what created the British Isles 60 million years ago. 
  • UK coastal change and conflict– a unit comprising the traditional debate around coastal protection from the natural forces on our island and the various engineering plans to hold nature at bay. 
  • The UKs evolving human landscape– this unit explores the changes to communities, the birth of urbanization in the UK and examining its various impacts up to the modern day. 
In Unit 3 students will learn about:  
  • People & the biosphere– the inter-relationship between humans and various environments 
  • Forests under threat- focus on the impacts to TRFs and Taiga forest of various human actions 
  • Consuming energy resources– explores the pressures we are putting on various resources around the world. 
Assessment 

Unit 1. 1 hour 30 minutes written exam 

Unit 2. 1 hour 30 minutes including questions relating to the student’s fieldwork 

Unit 3. 1 hour 30 minutes of comprehension style, synoptic paper 

Supporting  Information 
Useful Web Sites 

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/uk/ 

https://www.rgs.org/geography/ 

https://worldmapper.org/ 

3 things you can do to support your child 
  1. Be globally aware and keep up to date with current affairs. 
  2. Watch geographical documentaries whether it be a Planet Earth or something from National Geographic 
  3. Have a world map and or a globe in their room to improve locational knowledge. 

 

 

 

 Intent 

As a department we aim to fire a student's curiosity about the history of Britain and the wider world.  We believe it is important for students to study the major events of the past and how societies have been organised. By doing so, students have a greater understanding of how the past influences the present and shapes the future. 

The study of History should aim to create a spirit of harmony and tolerance. It should seek to explain the differences but also emphasise the similarities. History has a part to play in the creation of a just and equitable society. Moreover, the department will promote this through a balanced curriculum, which seeks to break down preconceptions about certain sections of society including minority groups. It will also endeavour to promote British Values and SMSC.  

The department also has a role to play in providing genuine academic enjoyment. It is also, therefore, the remit of the department to produce thoughtful and stimulating lessons which access a wide range of teaching and learning methods. 

Finally, it is essential that the work that the students undertake in this subject should create and enforce an intellectual discipline that students will carry with them to other areas of study and furnish them with analytical, evaluative and literacy skills which will help them in later life. 

Key Stage 3  
Year 7 Information 

Firstly, students will complete an introductory programme called ‘What is History?’ Whereby we assess their prior knowledge and also introduce them to the skills which are needed in History for example looking at what is meant by themes and analyzing historical sources.  After that we focus on life during Medieval times, 1066 - c1550. The topics we cover include: 

  • The Norman Conquest and the consequences of it 
  • Medieval Life and beliefs
  • The Crusades
  • Medieval medicine and the Black Death
  • The Tudors 
Year 8 Information 

During Year 8 we continue to look at mainly British History in a chronological manner from c.1500-1915.  

The topics we cover include: 

  • A focused study on Elizabethan England 
  • The English Civil War
  • Major events of the 1600s for example the Great Fire of London and the Great Plague
  • The Industrial Revolution
  • An in-depth study of the black peoples of the Americas
  • An introduction to the American West
  • An introduction to World War One 
Year 9 Information 
  • Students will focus on the twentieth century. The topics we cover include:
  • The major events and consequences of World War One, including the role of women and female suffrage. 
  • The interwar years and the rise of Fascism
  • Turning points of World War Two and the Home Front
  • The Holocaust
  • Key events of the Cold War 
Key Stage 4  
Year 10 Information 

Students will have the opportunity to develop a variety of skills, including source analysis, comparing interpretations and essay writing skills.  

Success in this course will enable students to be experts in a variety of skills, such as reasoning, essay writing and research.  

The course is made up of four topics across 3 examined units:  

In Unit 1 

They will focus on Medicine in Britain c1250 - present, which is a thematic paper and has a source based historical environment element. 

They will learn about:  
  • Treatment, prevention and cures of Medieval Medicine
  • The changes made during Renaissance Medicine
  • Medical discoveries of the Industrial age
  • Breakthroughs of Modern Medicine
  • A historical environment unit looking at Medicine in World War One
In Unit 2 

There are two topics. Firstly, students will be looking at Early Elizabethan England, which is a British Depth Study. 

They will learn about:  
  • The problems Elizabeth faced when she became Queen
  • The challenges she faced both at home and from abroad
  • Aspects of Elizabethan life such as poverty, leisure and entertainment, exploration
Year 11 Information 

Students will complete the second of the Paper 2 topics, which is the American West. This is a periodic study. 

They will learn about:  
  • The lives and beliefs of Native Americans
  • Who migrated to the West and how it was settled
  • Conflicts which took place
  • The near destruction of the buffalo and the Native American way of life 
In Unit 3 

Students complete a Modern depth study, which is on the USA. 

They will learn about:  
  • The events which led to the forming of the Civil Rights Movement
  • The successes of the Civil Rights Movement and how it changed during the 1960s and 1970s
  • Why the USA got involved in the Vietnam war
  • Major events of the war
  • Why people opposed the war and how people protested
Assessment 

Unit 1. Medicine in Britain c1250-present 

Unit 2. Early Elizabethan England 1554-1558, the American West c 1835-c1895 

Unit 3. The USA, 1954-1975: conflict  at home and abroad  

Supporting  Information 
Useful Web Sites 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/subjects/z7svr82 

https://spartacus-educational.com/ 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/cbbc/shows/horrible-histories  

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p089zk0x 

3 things you can do to support your child 
  1. Encourage your child to question what they hear or read e.g. in books,  the media and social media  
  2. Support their reading development by encouraging them to read historical fiction or non-fiction books. Also, if possible, visit historic sites.  
  3. Tell them and share your family history or local history stories 

In Years 7, 8 and 9 students follow a scheme of work that ties in with the National Curriculum, attending discrete lessons once a week. Students will also be taught ICT within other subjects depending on the needs and scope of that subject. ICT and the needs of the students to become digitally literate is considered to be a cross-curricular subject.

The school is well equipped with 3 dedicated computer laps and a range of laptops that can be used in other classrooms.

Computer Science

This is a practical subject where learners can apply the knowledge and skills learned in the classroom to real-world problems. It is an intensely creative subject that involves invention and excitement. Our Computer Science course will value computational thinking, helping learners to develop the skills to solve problems and design systems that do so.

 Topics covered include :

  • Using ICT; Presentation Skills
  • Using Data and Information Sources; Internet Safety
  • Public Information Systems; Spreadsheet and Presentation Skills
  • Information Validity and Bias; Internet Skills
  • Models and Numeric Data; Spreadsheet Skills
  • Control Systems; Control Technology Skills- Product Design
  • Programming with software such as Python

Skills and interests to be successful at GCSE

 GCSE Computing students will be able to:

  • Develop their understanding of current and emerging technologies, understand how they work and apply this knowledge and understanding in a range of contexts.
  • Acquire and apply knowledge, technical skills and an understanding of the use of algorithms in computer programs to solve problems using programming.
  • Create computer programs of their own using both scaffolded resources as well as independent learning.
  • Use their knowledge and understanding of computer technology to become independent and discerning users of IT, able to make informed decisions about the use and be aware of the implications of different technologies.

 Where next

 App and Game development, Software Development, Web design and development, Database Administration, Network engineering, IT technical support, Project management.

Creative iMedia

If you like creating things on the computer, then Creative iMedia is the course you might choose.

It has 4 units, 3 of them are based on your coursework in making and changing images using Photoshop, making webpages and making games using Game Maker. One unit has a written exam .All the 4 units are worth 25% of the overall grade each.

You will gain grades equivalent to GCSE grades 8 - 1 on successful completion of the course.

  • R081: Pre-production skills(Year 10) This is a compulsory unit, based on all aspects of planning projects from Mood boards to Gantt Charts. It will also develop their understanding of the client brief, time frames, deadlines and preparation techniques that form part of the planning and creation process.
  • R082: Creating digital graphics (written assignment)
  • R085: Creating a multiple website (written assignment)
  • R087 Design an interactive Media Product. (written assignment)

Where next

Students wishing to go to College will be able to use their ICT skills to assist whichever course they pursue there; Students going into Apprenticeships will clearly be able to show employers and trainers the level of their ICT competence using a recognised qualification.

 

Intent 

This subject covers far more than how to add up and multiply. It is about developing the tools to solve problems enabling us to understand far more about the world around us and how things relate to each other. The Mathematics Department wants to inspire a love of mathematics through a broad, balanced and enjoyable mathematics provision and to provide students with access to a subject, which gives a means of communication that is powerful, concise. 

Our aim is to provide a mathematical environment in which a student will reach his or her maximum levels of achievement and understanding and to develop independent thinking, pride in their own work and co-operation between all students. 

Key Stage 3 

The following outlines the topics and skills that Key Stage 3 students will study through Years 7-9, in Maths. 

Year 7  
  • Addition and subtraction of integers, decimals and directed numbers 
  • Multiplication and division of integers, decimals and directed numbers 
  • Perimeter, Area 
  • Calculating the mean 
  • Highest common factor 
  • Lowest common multiple 
  • Angles on a line, at a point and in a triangle
  • Reflectional and rotational symmetry
  • Mixed and improper fractions
  • Multiplying and dividing fractions 
  • Fractions of amounts 
  • Using worded formulae, Substitution, Collecting like terms
  • Continuing sequences
  • Converting between, fractions, decimals and percentages 
  • Percentages of amounts
  • Pie charts
Year 8 
  • Calculating with powers
  • BIDMAS  Square roots 
  • Prime factor decomposition 
  • Using prime factors to find LCM and HCF 
  • Addition and subtraction of fractions 
  • Writing and using formulae 
  • Solving linear equations 
  • Inequalities 
  • Reading scales 
  • Units of measure 
  • Angles in parallel lines
  • Area of trapeziums, Area of compound shapes,
  • Converting between fractions, decimals and percentages 
  • Percentage change
  • Ratio 
  • Speed/distance/time 
  • Rounding 
  • Area and circumference of a circle
  • Volume of cuboids and prisms 
  • Bar charts 
  • Pictograms
  • Calculating averages 
  • Calculating the mean from frequency tables
Year 9  
  • Proportion – direct and inverse
  • Standard form (higher only)
  • Linear graphs  Expanding brackets 
  • Factorising expressions 
  • Finding the nth term of arithmetic sequences 
  • Rearranging formula  Compass constructions 
  • Angles in quadrilaterals and triangles including geometric notation 
  • Similarity and congruence (higher only) 
  • Interior and exterior angles (higher only) 
  • Solving equations 
  • Drawing quadratic and cubic graphs 
  • Solving equations graphically 
  • Representing and solving inequalities 
  • Rotation, Translation, Reflection
  • Pythagoras 
  • Trigonometry 
  • Stem and leaf graphs 
  • Scatter graphs 
  • Average calculations 
  • Estimating the mean 
  • Probability 
  • Venn diagrams 
Key Stage 4  

The following outlines the topics and skills that Key Stage 4 students will study through Years 10 and 11 in Maths. 

  • Number   
  • Algebra 
  • Ratio, proportion and rates of change  
  • Geometry and measure  
  • Probability 
  • Statistics 
Course Details 

Exam Board  - Edexcel  

Specification/QAN  1MA1  

Qualification GCSE  

Tiers Two  

Grades Higher 9 to 4 Foundation 5 to 1  

Assessment  

100% Examination Three papers of the same duration, equally weighted. 

All 1hr 30-minute papers, 1 non-calculator and 2 calculator. 

In more subject content this will be in Year 10  

  • Fractions of a quantity
  • Converting between fractions and decimals
  • Calculations with decimals
  • Percentages of amounts
  • Relative frequency
  • Sample space diagrams
  • Probability or mutually exclusive, independent and conditional events
  • Tree diagrams
  • Venn diagrams
  • Mensuration
  • Upper and lower bounds
  • Surds
  • Index laws
  • Pythagoras
  • Trigonometry
  • Growth and decay
  • Sectors and arcs
  • Exact calculations
  • Equations of lines
  • Parallel and perpendicular lines
  • Compound units
  • Gradients of curves
  • Factorising quadratics
  • Nth term of linear and quadratic sequences
  • Algebraic proof
  • Interior and exterior angles
  • Similarity and congruence
  • Transformations
  • Ratio
  • Summary statistics
  • Capture-recapture
  • Cumulative frequency
  • Box plots
  • Grouped data
Year 11 
  • Expanding brackets
  • Algebraic fractions
  • Linear equations
  • Quadratic equations
  • Polynomial functions
  • Simultaneous equations
  • Using graphs to estimate solutions
  • Inequalities
  • Trigonometric graphs
  • Area
  • Angles in polygons
  • Congruent triangles
Supporting Information 
Useful Web Sites 

Awarding body Website 

https://qualifications.pearson.com/en/qualifications/edexcel-gcses/mathematics-2015.html 

3 ways to support your child
  1. Checking that homework is done on time and to a satisfactory standard and assisting in any way they can to complete it if necessary.
  2. Encouraging use of maths in everyday contexts
  3. To encourage your child to revise regularly throughout the school term.

 

 

Intent 

By studying Media students will help to develop the analytical and critical skills required to evaluate and decode the many modes of media that they are exposed to in the modern world. 

It is important that students have a frame of reference for understanding the representations they see in television, social media, advertising, radio and the news. The subject encourages students to develop their opinions on how the media represents the world.  

This is a course that combines both the academic and the creative; students will have the chance to produce their own media products and therefore begin to gain valuable experience in an industry estimated to be worth £68.2 billion.  

Key Stage 4  

Students can choose to study GCSE Media Studies as part of their options.

Year 10 Information 

Students will be introduced to the 4 main theoretical components that frame the subject: media language, media representations, media industries and media audiences. Students will explore these components through a study of: 

  • Television: A contextual comparison of the programmes ‘Cuffs’ and ‘The Avengers’
  • Advertising: ‘The Lego Movie’ and associated products 
  • Music: ‘MOJO Magazine’
  • News: ‘The Observer’

Students will create their own media product as part of their coursework (NEA). Students must work independently to research, plan and produce one of the four following media forms in response to a set brief: magazine, TV programme, music video or online content.   

Year 11 Information 

Students will continue to revise the exam content from Year 10 as well as build their knowledge by exploring: 

  • Music: A comparison of two music videos and a study of Radio One’s ‘Live Lounge’
  • News: A contextual study of contemporary and historic editions of ‘The Observer’

Assessment 

The course is split between exams and NEA: 70% exam and 30% NEA. 

Students sit 2 exams at the end of Year 11. 

We follow the OCR specification.  

Supporting  Information 

Useful Web Sites 

https://www.mediaed.org/ 

http://mediahistoryproject.org/ 

https://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/gcse/media-studies-j200-from-2017/  

3 things you can do to support your child 
  1. Provide your child with access to the news and discuss interesting stories.  
  2. Visit the cinema together to watch new releases.  
  3. Discuss the use of stereotypes and representations in advertising and other aspects of media. 

 

 

 

Intent

Music is a specialist arts subject. It has its own vocabulary, conventions and methodology. It provides a valuable learning experience which develops the aesthetic, intellectual, social and emotional life of the students.  It is a universal language that embodies one of the highest forms of creativity. Our music curriculum is designed to engage and inspire pupils to develop a love of music and their talent as musicians, and so increase their self-confidence, creativity and sense of achievement. As students make progress, they should develop a critical engagement with music, allowing them to compose, and to listen with discrimination to a range of different styles and genres.

At Carrington our students will learn to perform, listen to, review and evaluate music across a range of historical periods, genres, styles and traditions. Students will learn to sing and to use their voices to create and compose music on their own and with others. They also have the opportunity to learn a musical instrument and use technology appropriately to help them progress to the next level of musical excellence. They will be able to understand and explore how music is created, produced and communicated. 

Key Stage 3

KS3 Music lessons are designed to capture students’ interest and develop their understanding of the world around them.  Developing a musical appreciation of Samba, Reggae, African Drumming and 12 Bar Blues for example are all done through practical work exploring these genres.  Musical Futures Class Band projects drive engagement in Year 9 where a range of band and classroom instruments and vocal parts combine to deliver a pop song arrangement. Composing Film Music offers a great opportunity to learn how to create using Cubase specialist music software in the Music Technology Suite.

Students in KS3 have access to at least one lesson of Music per week, as well as the chance to take part in extra-curricular clubs including choir, concert band, BTEC music club and Key Stage 3 music club for instrumentalists. Christmas concert, summer concert, BTEC Music performances plus opportunities to perform to an audience in lessons provide formal and informal opportunities for students to showcase their musical talents.

Key Stage 3 Learners will:

  • play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts, using their voices and playing musical instruments with increasing accuracy, fluency, control and expression
    • improvise and compose music for a range of purposes using the inter-related elements of music
    • listen with attention to detail and recall sounds with increasing aural memory
    • use and understand staff and other musical notations
    • appreciate and understand a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians
    • develop an understanding of the history of music

Key Stage 3 Overview

Year 7 Units

Unit 1 Elements of Music (Bridging Unit) Main foci: Performing & Composing Skills                                A01; A02:A03; A04

Unit 2 ‘Last Christmas’ ( Musical Futures) Main foci: Performing and Listening & Evaluating Skills.     A01; A04

Unit 3  Musical Processes Main foci: Composing and Listening & Evaluating Skills .                                 A01: A02; A04

Unit 4  ‘Last Class Standing’ Main foci: Performing and Listening & Evaluating Skills                               A01. A04

Unit 5 Musical Structures Main foci Composing and Listening & Evaluating Skills                                     A01; A02; A03; A04

Year 8 Units

Unit 1 Blues Music - Main Foci: Performing; Listening & Evaluating Skills. Social/Cultural Context                AO1: AO4

Unit 2 Hooks & Riffs- Main Foci: Composing; Listening & Evaluating Skills.                                                   AO1: AO2; AO3; AO4

Unit 3 - Music for Dance - Main Foci: Performing; Listening & Evaluating Skills. Social/Cultural Context       AO1: AO4

Unit 4 - Introduction to Music for Film & African Drumming- Main Foci: Performing; Listening & Evaluating Skills.                                                                         

Social/Cultural Context                                                                                                                                                 AO1: AO2; AO3; AO4

Unit 5 Rock ‘n Roll Music - Main Foci: Performing; Listening & Evaluating Skills. Social/Cultural Context AO1: AO2; AO3; AO4

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Year 9 Units

Unit 1  Musical Futures (Whole Class Band Live Performance Project 1. Main Foci: Performing; Listening & Evaluating Skills AO1: AO2; AO3; AO4

Unit 2  Music for Film (Adding a sound track to a short film),  Main Foci: Composing & Music & Media Awareness/ Music Technology skills.  AO2; AO3; AO4

Unit 3  Reggae Music (Whole Class Band ‘Buffalo Soldier’. Main Foci: Performing; Liastening & Evaluating Skills. Social/Cultural Context. AO1; AO3; AO4

Unit 4 Samba Music from Brazil   Main Foci: Class Band Performance (including improvisation);  Listening & Evaluating Skills AO1; AO4

Unit 5 Musical Futures Medley (Whole Class Band Live Performance Project 2. Main Foci Performing. Listening & Evaluating Skills  AO1: AO2; AO3; AO4

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Music Assessment Objectives

AO1: Perform with technical control, expression and interpretation

AO2: Compose and develop musical ideas with technical control and coherence

AO3: Demonstrate and apply musical knowledge

AO4: Use appraising skills to make evaluative and critical judgements about music

 

Key Stage 4

Students who choose to study BTEC Music in Year 10 and 11 will develop their overall musicianship through units covering solo and ensemble performance work and composing music to a given brief and recording their ideas on Cubase music software. They will also be required to contribute to a whole group project in which each learner is responsible for one aspect of promotion for a product (concert/ show/ fundraiser) they choose to organise. The unit ‘Working in the Music Industry requires learners to research roles and organisations within the music industry. This is the only unit of the four which is assessed externally. The external examination is a written paper of 1 hour. 

Key Stage 4 Learners follow the BTEC First Award in Music
 Foundation Course.  Including workshops on: Theory of Music; instrumental and/or Vocal skills; Music Technology Software.

Units covered in Year 10.

Introducing Music Performance. Internally assessed. 25% of course.  Play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts, with increasing accuracy, fluency, control and expression. This unit is divided into two assignment:  ‘Getting Better’ assignment looks at technical development including warm-up exercises, scales, arpeggios, technical skills, understanding different types of chords, known pieces to warm-up etc. ‘My Audition’ assignment involves assessing practical performances. Both assignments involved the completion of a log tracking progress over time.

Managing a Music Product (Compulsory Unit)  Internally assessed.  25% of course. Planning, preparing and delivering a music product. In this unit understanding what constitutes industry standard music promotion is very important.

Unit covered in Year 10 & 11

Working in the Music Industry. This is a written examination of one hour and is externally assessed.  This unit covers roles and organisations which make up the music industry. This unit is delivered across both Year 10 and part of Year 11. Learners normally take this examination in January of Year 11.

Introducing Music Composition. Unit covered in Year 11. Internally assessed. 25% of course. Compose music in response to a given brief. Learners use their preferred instrument to create their original ideas as well as Cubase music software to record/develop these into a fully-formed final composition.

A learner can achieve one of the following results once the four units are assessed:

Level 2 Distinction * (a learner awarded this grade has accumulated a number of Distinction across different units)

Level 2 Distinction

Level 2 Merit

Level 2 Pass

Level 1 Pass

Useful Websites

Pearson Qualifications BTEC First Award in Music

BTEC First Award in Music Specification

A few things you can do to support your child:

  1. If learning an instrument or having singing lessons please encourage short but regular practice sessions. Remind them that it is not the amount of time they put into it but the quality.
  2. For learners who might occasionally forget their music at home or at school organise 2 copies of the music so that there is always a spare copy at home.
  3. Encourage them to listen to a variety of different types/genres of music and ask them what they think about it?
  4. Where there is an opportunity, take them to a concert. Local theatres occasionally have visiting shows and world renowned orchestras. There are often student discounts on offer,

 Intent 

 A high-quality physical education curriculum inspires all students to succeed and excel in competitive sport and other physically demanding activities. It should provide opportunities for students to become physically confident in a way which supports their health and fitness. Opportunities to compete in sport and other activities build character and help to embed values such as fairness and respect. 

Students will build on and embed the physical development and skills learned in key stages 1 and 2, become more competent, confident and expert in their techniques, and apply them across different sports and physical activities. They should understand what makes a performance effective and how to apply these principles to their own and others’ work. They should develop the confidence and interest to get involved in exercise, sports and activities out of school and in later life, and understand and apply the long-term health benefits of physical activity. 

Key Stage 3 
Year 7 Information 

The curriculum for Physical Education aims to ensure that all students:  

  • develop competence to excel in a broad range of physical activities  
  • are physically active for sustained periods of time  
  • engage in competitive sports and activities  
  • lead healthy, active lives.  

        topics we cover include:  

  • Components of physical and skill-related fitness  
  • Training methods  
  • Training principles  
  • Fitness tests  
  • Practical activities from a variety of invasion games, net games, striking and fielding games, athletic activities, OAA, dance and gymnastic activities  
Year 8 Information 

Students continue to build on the skills they have developed in Year 7.

Topics we cover include: 

  • Components of physical and skill-related fitness  
  • Training methods  
  • Training principles  
  • Fitness tests  
  • Practical activities from a variety of invasion games, net games, striking and fielding games, athletic activities, dance and gymnastic activities  
Year 9 Information 

Students will explore topics which build on prior knowledge, and continue studying topics which will prepare them for BTEC Sport at Key Stage 4 should they wish to follow this path.               

Topics we cover include: 

  • Components of physical and skill-related fitness  
  • Training methods  
  • Training principles  
  • Fitness tests  

Practical activities from a variety of invasion games, net games, striking and fielding games, athletic activities, trampolining, dance and gymnastic activities  

Key Stage 4  
Year 10 and 11 Information for core Physical Education 

All students will study core PE in Year 10 and 11. Students will tackle complex and demanding physical activities. They should get involved in a range of activities that develops personal fitness and promotes an active, healthy lifestyle. 

Students will: 

  • use and develop a variety of tactics and strategies to overcome opponents in team and individual games [for example, badminton, basketball, cricket, football, hockey, netball, rounders, rugby and tennis]  
  • develop their technique and improve their performance in other competitive sports,[for example, athletics and gymnastics], or other physical activities [for example, dance]  
Year 10 and 11 Information for Btec Sport 

Students can chose to study BTEC Sport in Year 10 and 11.

This course provides an engaging and relevant introduction to the world of sport. It incorporates important aspects of the industry, such as fitness testing and training for sport and exercise, practical sports performance and sports leadership. It enables students to develop and apply their knowledge, while also developing a range of relevant practical, communication and technical skills. 

Year 10 Information 

The Pearson BTEC Level 1/Level 2 First Award in Sport includes one externally assessed unit. This will help learners as they progress either into higher levels of vocational learning or to related academic qualifications, by providing independent assessment evidence of learning alongside the portfolio-based assessment. This approach will also assist learners in developing a range of transferable skills, and in applying their knowledge in unfamiliar contexts. The remaining units are internally assessed. Internal assessment enables learners to develop a wider range of skills and provide evidence towards meeting the unit assessment criteria. 

Evidence for assessment can be generated through a range of activities, including written work, practical performance and verbal presentations. 

In Unit 1  
Fitness for Sport and Exercise they will:  
  • know about the components of fitness and the principles of training 
  • explore different fitness training methods 
  • investigate fitness testing to determine fitness levels. 
  • externally assessed using on screen test: 1 hour and 15 minutes
In Unit 2 
Practical Performance in Sport they will:  
  • understand the rules, regulations and scoring systems for two selected sports 
  • practically demonstrate skills, techniques and tactics in two selected sports 
  • be able to review their own sports performance. 
Year 11 Information  
In Unit 3 Applying the Principles of Personal Training they will: 
  • Design a personal fitness training programme  
  • Know about the musculoskeletal system and cardiorespiratory system and the effects on the body during fitness training 
  • Implement a self-designed personal fitness training programme to achieve own goals and objectives 
  • Review a personal fitness training programme 
In Unit 6 Leading Sports Activities they will:  
  • know the attributes associated with successful sports leadership 
  • undertake the planning and leading of sports activities 
  • review the planning and leading of sports activities. 
Assessment 

Unit 1. Fitness for Sport and Exercise 25% External examination assessment 

Unit 2 Practical  Performance in Sport, Unit 3 Applying the Principles of Personal Training and  Unit 6 Leading Sports Activities– total 75% Internal assessment: Controlled Assessment Assignments 

Supporting  Information 
Useful Web Sites 

www.sportengland.org 

www.youthsporttrust.org 

www.uksport.gov.uk  

3 things you can do to support your child
  1. Ensure that your child has their PE kit in school for every PE lesson and/or club 
  2. Encourage them to be involved in extra-curricular clubs and/or teams at The Warwick School 
  3. Encourage them to be active outside of school and/or become involved in physical activity in a club or sporting activity in the community 

 

 

 

Intent

Psychology is the scientific study of the human mind and its functions; how it dictates and influences our behaviour. It's about understanding what makes people tick and how this understanding can help us address many of the problems and issues in society today. The OCR specification is designed with the Time to Change programme from leading mental health charities Mind and Rethink Mental Illness to promote positive mental health and to reduce the stigma associated with it. Along with Time to Change we hope to inspire a new generation to know more about mental health to support not only their own but their peers’ mental health too and create a better future for all of us

Our intention is to develop critical thinkers who can use their understanding of human behaviour to improve society; to enable students to be able to understand not only theirs but others behaviour and to give lifelong skills in preparation for living successful adult lives.

Content

Social Influence

Criminal Psychology

Sleep and Dreaming

Psychological Problems

Developmental Psychology

Memory

Within each of these we also cover research methods and neuropsychology.

Course Details /Assessment

Exam board: OCR

Qualification: GCSE Psychology 9-1

Assessment: 100% externally assessed consisting of 2 exam papers taken at the end of the course that each make up 50% of the whole GCSE. They are written papers with a range of multiple choice, short and long written answer questions. Each paper is 90 minutes and 90 marks.

3 things to help your child:

  • Encourage them to observe behaviours around them and think about what could be motivating them? This could be directly witnessed or seen in the media or on the news.
  • Discuss news stories relating to any research findings. Think about the methods used, results and statistics and how they are reported to aid with understanding and representing information. This could be directly related to any of the areas of psychology listed above or not. Any exposure to statistics and graphs / charts will be useful.
  • If they have younger family members encourage interactions with them to help them observe developmental milestones (Year 11).

 Intent 

‘All children need to acquire core knowledge and understanding of the beliefs and practices of the religions and worldviews which not only shape their history and culture but which guide their own development. The modern world needs young people who are sufficiently confident in their own beliefs and values that they can respect the religious and cultural differences of others, and contribute to a cohesive and compassionate society.’  (The Right Hon, Michael Gove, former Secretary of State for Education) 

Achieving top grades in this subject is evidence that students have accomplished what Mr. Gove talks about and is an indication that students have developed a high degree of emotional intelligence and skills, making them more attractive to employers from many top paying industries who recognize and promote the place of these values in their organizations.  

The subject certainly is not what it used to be many years ago and definitely is not just for people who are religious or to act as a medium of conversion to faith. Today, study of this subject helps students to develop their own sense of identity and is proven to improve their mental, cognitive and linguistic development, offering distinctive opportunities to promote students spiritual, moral, social and cultural development, helping them to better articulate themselves and face the ever-changing demands of the contemporary world we live in. Students learn information and skills that will help them in other subjects as well as when they are at college, sixth form and university. These are info and skills such as understanding, interpreting and evaluating texts, data, sources of wisdom and authority and other evidence which will help their progress in English, History, Mathematics, Geography or if they go to university to study e.g. sociology, law, politics or psychology.  

Our students will access a high quality enjoyable RE curriculum that will help them to develop a moral compass and to reflect on their own beliefs as they make informed personal choices and empathize with others. Our unique lessons offer a structured and safe space during curriculum time for reflection, discussion, dialogue and debate and gives students an understanding of wellbeing, encouraging a fascination of the world and our place in it, and helping them to develop a resilience to the challenges that life often brings. Our main intent is that it helps to make them the best they can be. It is no surprise that it is a favourable subject with many employers. 

Key Stage 3  
Year 7 Information 

Students will spend a week completing an introduction to the subject, which includes a baseline test to gauge their existing knowledge and skills, the results of which will act as one of the factors against which their Yr7 progress will be measured. They will study three of the six main world and UK religions, each of which will be followed by an assessment of the knowledge and skills developed during the study of each religion. 

The topics we will cover are
  • Judaism
  • Christianity 
  • Islam 

Students will learn about each of these religions and a selection of philosophical and ethical real world issues surrounding them. For each religion, we will also consider the views of non-religious people such as atheists and agnostics. 

Year 8 Information 

Students will study three of the six main world and UK religions, each of which will be followed by an assessment of the knowledge and skills developed during the study of each religion. 

The topics we will cover are
  • Hinduism
  • Buddhism 
  • Sikhism 

Students will learn about each of these religions and a selection of philosophical and ethical real world issues surrounding them. For each religion, we will also consider the views of non-religious people such as atheists and agnostics. 

Across Year 7 and Year 8, students will also be introduced to alternative religions and movements such as Mormonism, Paganism, Rastafarianism, Jediism, Jehovah Witness, Scientology, The Amish, Rastafarianism, Prince Philip Worship and more. 

Year 9 Information 

Students will begin study of GCSE Religious Studies, Philosophy & Ethics. They will build on the knowledge and skills developed across Year 7 and Year 8 and will explore important and relevant political, economic, legal, sociological, historical and religious issues in today’s world. 

Our Philosophy and Ethics course has been especially designed to suit our students as they explore their own ideas and the points of view of others. It provides a unique opportunity to look at the important issues in their lives, and to develop an understanding of questions concerning morality and the meaning of life in today’s society. Students will be given the opportunity to develop their own opinions and consider a range of secular (non-religious), religious and moral beliefs and viewpoints. We provide a highly inclusive environment where learners enjoy their education and pupils at all levels are helped to achieve their potential. 

In Year 9, students will study Paper 1- Christianity, which accounts for 50% of their GCSE. They will study the following topics: 

Section A: Christian Beliefs 

Section B: Marriage and the Family 

Section C: Living the Christian Life 

Section D: Matters of Life and Death  

At the end of each unit, students will be assessed to check their progress.  

The 1 hour 45 minute GCSE exam for the entire of Paper 1 will be taken at the end of Year 10. 

Key Stage 4  
Year 10 Information 

Students will build on the knowledge and skills developed across Year 9 and will continue their GCSE studies. They will complete the remaining 50% of the course and study the following topics: 

Paper 2- Islam  

Section A: Muslim Beliefs 

Section B: Crime and Punishment 

Section C: Living the Muslim Life 

Section D: Peace and Conflict 

At the end of each unit, students will be assessed to check their progress. 

The 1 hour 45 minute GCSE exam for the entire of Paper 2 will be taken at the end of Year 10.  

To summarize, students will sit two exams- GCSE Paper 1 and GCSE Paper 2. Each exam is 1 hour and 45 minutes each and each is worth 50% of their GCSE Grade. 

Assessment 

Paper 1- Christianity- 50% External Assessment by exam board- 1 hour 45 minutes exam 

Paper 2- Islam- 50% External Assessment by exam board- 1 hour 45 minutes exam 

There is no coursework. 

Supporting  Information 
Useful Web Sites 

https://www.natre.org.uk/ 

https://www.cofeguildford.org.uk/education/standing-advisory-council-on-religious-education/surrey-agreed-syllabus-for-religious-education 

https://qualifications.pearson.com/en/qualifications/edexcel-gcses/religious-studies-b-2016.html 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/subjects/z7hs34j 

https://ethicsonline.co.uk/ 

http://re-definitions.org.uk/ 

https://www.reonline.org.uk/subject-knowledge/ 

http://www.cleo.net.uk/resources/index.php?ks=4&cur=15  

https://request.org.uk/ 

https://www.westminster-abbey.org/learning/teaching-resources 

https://www.truetube.co.uk/ 

https://humanism.org.uk/education/ 

3 things you can do to support your child 
  1. Ensure they are completing all the homework set  
  2. Encourage them to respond to teacher feedback in their exercise books and improve on their work 
  3. Extend their answers by not just writing one line to explain their point but instead a small paragraph to justify their point- see class teacher for details on how this can be more effectively done if unsure. 

 

 

 

Intent 

Science is all around us. It explains why “in space, no one can hear you scream”, provides the electricity that we would struggle to live without, and the strategies for how to overcome a pandemic. However, without the inquisitive minds of past and future scientists, there would not be the developments in medicine, resources and technology that we rely on; and yet there is still so much more to discover and many questions left to answer.  

Our intention is to develop an understanding of the ‘Big ideas’ within the scientific disciplines of Biology, Chemistry and Physics in order to provide a solid foundation that may inspire our students to pursue the subject into further education and a career in Science Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM). Practical investigations and demonstrations are included as much as possible to excite and motivate the students, showing the relevance of the subject in the world around them. Lessons not only develop opportunities to apply knowledge but aims to develop the investigative and mathematical skills needed to prepare our students for a rapidly changing future. The science curriculum gives students the opportunity to develop the confidence to work both collaboratively and independently, organize their writing logically and eloquently, problem solve, consider moral questions, such as genetic screening and stem cell research and consider their responsibility for the world around them.  

Key Stage 3  
Year 7 Information 

Students will complete an introductory unit to familiarise themselves with the laboratory, equipment and the importance of health and safety.  They will plan an investigation with the aim to explore a hypothesis, consider variables, write a method, present and interpret results.  

Further topics we cover are: 

  • Cells and reproduction 
  • Particles and separating techniques 
  • Introduction to elements and the periodic table 
  • Introduction to Forces 
  • Breathing and respiration
  • Plants and photosynthesis
Year 8 Information 

Students will explore topics that interleave key concepts from Year 7 and introduce further new content.  

The topics we cover are: 

  • Waves (light and sound) 
  • Enzymes and digestion 
  • Simple chemical reactions 
  • Energy 
  • Forces - Newton’s Laws 
  • Ecological relationships and human impact
Year 9 Information 

Students will continue to build on prior knowledge, and study topics which will prepare them for Science at Key Stage 4.  

The topics we cover are: 

  • Acids and alkalis 
  • Electricity and magnetism 
  • Microbes and disease 
  • Inheritance and evolution 

In the summer term, students will study the first topics of the GCSE course: 

  • Key Concepts in Biology 
  • States of matter and separation techniques 
  • Forces and motion 
Key Stage 4  

All Students study Combined Science in Year 10 and 11, unless they have opted to study Triple Science. Combined science awards 2 GCSEs.

Year 10 Information 

Students will build on the skills and knowledge from the KS3 Science curriculum to further develop their understanding of concepts in more depth and within a range of contexts. Amongst the range of hands-on opportunities, they will also complete core practical investigations, students may need to recall these methods in the final examinations. 

Topics studied in Year 10 are:  

Biology 
  • Cells and control
  • Genetics
  • Natural selection and genetic modification
  • Health, disease and the development of medicines
Chemistry 
  • Atomic structure and the periodic table 
  • Chemical structures and bonding
  • Acids and alkalis
  • Calculations involving masses
  • Reactivity and extracting metals
Physics  
  • Conservation of energy 
  • Waves 
  • Light and the Electromagnetic Spectrum
  • Radioactivity
Year 11 Information 

Students continue to build on previous skills and knowledge, including core practical investigations. 

Topics studied in Year 11 are:  

Biology 
  • Plant structure and functions
  • Animal co-ordination, control and homeostasis
  • Exchange and transport in animals
  • Ecosystems and material cycles
Chemistry 
  • Groups in the periodic table
  • Rates of reaction
  • Fuels
  • Earth and atmosphere
Physics  
  • Energy and forces
  • Electricity and circuits 
  • Magnetism and electromagnetic induction
  • Particle matter and forces
Assessment 

The course is 100% externally assessed consisting of 6 written examination papers. There are 60 marks available in each paper: 

Biology Paper 1 – Key concepts of Biology (Year 9 topic) and all Year 10 topics 

Biology Paper 2 - Key concepts of Biology (Year 9 topic) and all Year 11 topics 

Chemistry paper 1 - States of matter and separation techniques (Year 9 topic) and all Year 10 topics 

Chemistry paper 2 - Atomic structure and the periodic table, Chemical structures and bonding, Calculations involving masses (Year 10 topics) and all Year 11 topics 

Physics paper 1 – All year 10 topics 

Physics paper 2 – All year 11 topics 

Supporting  Information 

Useful Web Sites 

https://www.sciencenewsforstudents.org/ 

BBC Bitesize 

Edexcel Science exam board specification 

3 things you can do to support your child 
  1. Ensure that your child completes at least 4 daily goals a week of the intelligent on-line learning quiz platform “Tassomai”  
  2. Support their home learning to develop regular revision habits. This could involve; producing revision cards, mind maps and glossaries of key words. Working through topics and quizzes on-line e.g. BBC Bitesize, watching revision videos on GCSEpod and completing past paper questions via home learning tasks.   
  3. Encourage further reading or watching of television programmes and news features regarding current scientific topics and developments.  

 

Intent 

If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his language, that goes to his heart. - Nelson Mandela 

MFL plays a vital part in the curriculum. It helps to fire student's curiosity about the world around them. It is important for students to develop an awareness of the world around them and be able to communicate with people in their own language. By doing so students have a greater understanding of their own language and how is has been shaped. 

It is the department's belief that every pupil has the right to study MFL. At Key Stage Three this is compulsory, students will study French or Spanish and at Key Stage Four it is left to the individual students to decide whether or not they wish to pursue the subject. 

The study of MFL should aim to create a spirit of harmony and tolerance. It should seek to explain the differences but also emphasise the similarities. MFL has a part to play in the creation of a just and equitable society. Moreover, the department will promote this through a balanced curriculum, which seeks to spark an enjoyment in discovering other languages and cultures. 

The department also has a role to play in providing genuine academic enjoyment. It is also, therefore, the remit of the department to produce thoughtful and stimulating lessons which access a wide range of teaching and learning methods. 

Finally, it is essential that the work that the students undertake in this subject should create and enforce an intellectual discipline that students will carry with them to other areas of study and furnish them with analytical, evaluative and literacy skills which will help them in later life. 

Key Stage 3  
Year 7 Information 

Students will complete an introductory programme to Spanish, there is no requirement to have any previous knowledge. All lessons will be based around the four skills - listening, reading, speaking and writing.  The topics we cover include: 

  • Talking about yourself  
  • My free time  
  • School  
  • My family life  
  • My town 
Year 8 Information 

Students will build on the knowledge they gained in Year 7, more grammar will be introduced and we work on different tenses.  We will continue to work on the four skills listening, reading, speaking and writing developing confidence. The topics we cover include: 

  • Holidays  
  • Leisure time  
  • Food  
  • Going out  
  • Summer plans 
Year 9 Information 

Students will build on the knowledge they gained in Year 7 and 8, they will begin to be able to express themselves in different tenses, with increasing fluency and confidence.  The lessons will continue to be based on the four key skills listening, reading, speaking and writing.  Students will begin to write and speak at length and can understand longer passages in spoken and written Spanish.  The topics we cover include: 

  • Personal likes and dislikes 
  • The future world of work 
  • Healthy living  
  • World issues  
  • Planning a holiday to Madrid 
Key Stage 4  

Students can chose to study GCSE Spanish in Year 10 and 11.

Year 10 Information 

Students will begin their AQA GCSE course, they will build on what they have learnt at Key Stage Three and apply the grammar and vocabulary in a more complex way.  As before the students will work on the four different skills listening, reading, speaking and writing. Success in this course can lead to many different avenues including travel and tourism, working in a global company or journalism. 

The course is based on three themes. 

In Theme 1 ‘Identity and culture’ they will learn about:  
  • Relationships with Family and Friends
  • Marriage and partnership
  • Social media
  • Technology
  • Music, cinema and TV
  • Food and eating out
  • Sport
  • Spanish customs
  • Spanish festivals
In Theme 2 ‘Local, national, international and global areas of interest’ they will learn about:  
  • Home 
  • Where I live 
  • Charity and voluntary work 
  • Healthy and Unhealthy living 
Year 11 Information 

Students will continue deepening their knowledge of the French language they will complete Theme 2 and Theme 3. 

In Theme 2 ‘Local, national, international and global areas of interest’ they will learn about:  
  • The environment 
  • Poverty and homelessness 
  • Holidays and Travel 
 In Theme 3 ‘Current and future study and employment’ they will learn about 
  • School and subjects 
  • Life at school and college 
  • University or work? 
  • Choice of career 
Assessment 

The GCSE is assessed in four exams, Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking - all worth 25% 

Supporting  Information 
Useful Web Sites 

www.wordreference.com 

www.duolingo.com 

www.conjuguemos.com 

3 things you can do to support your child 
  1. Foster an interest in all things Hispanic.  Can they name all the Spanish speaking countries? Talk about Spanish culture, food, sport, music etc.  
  2. Encourage your child to have a go, for many this will be a new subject, encourage them to be involved in the lessons and encourage them when doing their homework.  Maybe download the Duolingo app and start learning Spanish too!  
  3. Support with your child’s homework by testing them on vocabulary and grammar, this will help boost their confidence. 

 Intent 

Triple Science is for students who are fully engaged in this subject. Our intent is to further develop the breadth, depth and confidence in their knowledge and skills so that they can potentially go on and study science post-16 and beyond.  

As with Key Stage 3 Science, practical investigations and demonstrations are included as much as possible to excite and motivate the students, showing the relevance of the subject in the world around them. Lessons not only develop opportunities to apply knowledge but aims to develop the investigative and mathematical skills needed to prepare our students for a rapidly changing future. The science curriculum gives students the opportunity to develop the confidence to work both collaboratively and independently, organize their writing logically and eloquently, problem solve, consider moral questions, such as genetic screening and stem cell research and consider their responsibility for the world around them.  

Key Stage 4  

All Triple Science students study the same topics as in Combined Science, with additional content included in order to be awarded 3 separate GCSE grades (one for each discipline of Biology, Chemistry and Physics).

Year 10 Information 

Students will build on the skills and knowledge from the KS3 Science curriculum to further develop their understanding of concepts in more depth and within a range of contexts. Amongst the range of hands-on opportunities they will also complete core practical investigations, students may need to recall these methods in the final examinations. 

Topics studied in Year 10 are (italics represent Triple science only content):  

Biology 
  • Cells and control (the brain and the eye)
  • Genetics (protein synthesis, multiple and missing alleles)
  • Natural selection and genetic modification (development of Darwin’s theory)
  • Health, disease and the development of medicines (Virus lifecycles, plant defences and diseases, monoclonal antibodies)
Chemistry 
  • Atomic structure and the periodic table 
  • Chemical structures and bonding
  • Acids and alkalis
  • Calculations involving masses
  • Reactivity and extracting metals (Transitional metals, alloys and electroplating)
  • Quantitative methods, dynamic equilibria, volume of gases calculations, chemical and fuels cell
Physics  
  • Conservation of energy 
  • Waves (Ears and hearing, ultrasound and infrasound)
  • Light and the Electromagnetic Spectrum (Ray diagrams, colour, heat and radiation)
  • Radioactivity (Nuclear fission and fusion)
  • Astronomy
Year 11 Information 

Students continue to build on previous skills and knowledge, including core practical investigations. 

Topics studied in Year 11 are:  

Biology 
  • Plant structure and functions (plant adaptations and plant hormones)
  • Animal co-ordination, control and homeostasis (Thermoregulation and Osmoregulation)
  • Exchange and transport in animals (factors affecting diffusion)
  • Ecosystems and material cycles (assessing pollution, food security and decomposition)
Chemistry 
  • Groups in the periodic table 
  • Rates of reaction
  • Fuels
  • Earth and atmosphere
  • Alcohols, carboxylic acids and polymers
  • Qualitative analysis, composite materials and nanoparticles
Physics  
  • Energy and forces
  • Electricity and circuits (static electricity and electric fields) 
  • Magnetism and electromagnetic induction 
  • Particle matter and forces (pressure in air and fluids)
Assessment 

The course is 100% externally assessed consisting of 6 written examination papers. There are 100 marks available in each paper: 

Biology Paper 1 – Key concepts of Biology (Year 9 topic) and all Year 10 topics 

Biology Paper 2 -  Key concepts of Biology (Year 9 topic) and all Year 11 topics 

Chemistry paper 1 - States of matter and separation techniques (Year 9 topic) and all Year 10 topics 

Chemistry Paper 2 - Atomic structure and the periodic table, Chemical structures and bonding, Calculations involving masses (Year 10 topics) and all Year 11 topics 

Physics Paper 1 – All year 10 topics 

Physics Paper 2 – All year 11 topics 

Supporting  Information 

Useful Web Sites 

https://www.sciencenewsforstudents.org/ 

BBC Bitesize - Chemistry 

BBC Bitesize - Physics 

BBC Bitesize - Biology 

Edexcel Science exam board specification 

Exam question practice 

3 things you can do to support your child 
  1. Ensure that your child completes at least 4 daily goals a week of the intelligent on-line learning quiz platform “Tassomai”  
  2. Support their home learning to develop regular revision habits. This could involve; producing revision cards, mind maps and glossaries of key words. Working through topics and quizzes on-line eg BBC Bitesize, watching revision videos on GCSEpod and completing past paper questions via home learning tasks.   
  3. Encourage further reading or watching of television programmes and news features regarding current scientific topics and developments.